What's wrong with this country

Discussion in 'Politics' started by HomeoftheJets, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. HomeoftheJets

    HomeoftheJets Well-Known Member

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    1. Trump and the far right. Deliberately ignorant of reality. Major pandemic? Nah no big deal, the media "overreaction" is a Democratic hoax. Drain the swamp of regular corrupt politicians and replace them with new ones an order of magnitude more corrupt. Also do everything in your power to inflame racial and political tensions to cover up the fact that your government makes George W. Bush's look competent by comparison.

    2. The far left. Without a leader (for now at least), but they're putting pressure on Biden. When it comes to fighting the good fight, anything goes. You can arrange mass gatherings during a pandemic and destroy all the property you want. Disagree? How dare you stand in the way of progress! If these people gain power, the oppressed will become the oppressors.

    3. The Fed-industrial complex. Pump trillions of dollars into the hands of wealthy investors, knowing they'll funnel it right into Big Tech. Then pander to the far left on social issues so they'll ignore the grift, all the while denying your policies have anything to do with inequality. Sit back on your piles of money and watch the far right and far left tear the country apart.
     
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  2. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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    You actually think they're oppressed?
     
  3. HomeoftheJets

    HomeoftheJets Well-Known Member

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    I think some of them are. Oppression is a complicated issue, and there are a lot of ways someone can be oppressed, regardless of whether they're part of the far left crowd or not.
     
  4. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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    We're all oppressed.

     
  5. NYJetsO12

    NYJetsO12 Well-Known Member

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    Sheesh ..talk about being serenaded while you dine ..I miss the Mexican guys with the guitars

    But to answer the OP question this country obviously detoured into some strange vortex as soon as Trump took over
     
  6. Ralebird

    Ralebird Well-Known Member

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    While I'm generally in agreement with what you've written here it seems like you've gone straight to part B without spending any time on part A. That is, what seems to becoming more and more, the acceptance of polarizing partisanship and the inability or unwillingness to admit that sometimes somebody on the "other side" gets it right and the accompanying thought that just maybe your own guy got it wrong this time.

    It's no surprise really because that is what we hear every day from those that we elect to support us. The problem is that no one wants to filter out the BS, they just applaud the guy wearing the same hat as they are and scorn the words of a guy in a different hat regardless of how sensible they might be. We don't owe any of them any allegiance; they owe everyone of us, regardless of where we sit on the spectrum. We need to demand better.
     
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  7. Harpua

    Harpua Well-Known Member

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    What’s wrong? Well, I’ll share something that reddit blocked with you


    CMV: this era of Americans is the most self centered and least “American” of our short history

    Growing up here I felt a sense of pride that comes from our schooling which leans heavily into the narrative of us as the fighters for justice over the English for independence, and again in 1812, and then hits heavily on the USA as the good guys against the Germans and Japan as a liberator and savior of the people they oppressed and exterminated.

    We were or at least were self identified as a people that sacrificed for freedom for all.

    .... and that brings me to my point. We call the generation that was involved in World War Two the “greatest generation” and look at what they did to preserve not only the American way of life but freedom from oppression for all the world with extreme reverence. They were the epitome of some gave all and all gave some. Many volunteered to go to war and fight, but everyone faced rationing of food and fule, ect to advance the war effort. While underground markets did grow out of this, the vast majority of Americans went without somethings to help the greater good.

    Fast forward to today’s Americans. We are in the midst of not only great racial tension, but a pandemic that is killing people at rates that echos that of past wars. We are being asked again to sacrifice. To stay socially distant and to wear masks. These should be simple requests that have become epic political battles about the economy and freedom.

    It’s my belief that you can’t have freedom without sacrifice, and far too many that talk about their freedom are not willing to make the sacrifice of wearing a mask to save their fellow Americans.
     
  8. stinkyB

    stinkyB 2009 Best Avatar Award Winner

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    A fish rots from the head.....
     
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  9. Jonathan_Vilma

    Jonathan_Vilma Well-Known Member

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    We're pretty much fucked either way with either side. Pick your poison.

    The best thing everyone can do is get as far away from metropolitan areas as possible and start trying to save as much money as possible for now and the future.
     
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  10. Dierking

    Dierking Well-Known Member

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    It’s Kaepernicks fault. Or Nancy Pelosi’s.
     
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  11. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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  12. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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  13. HerndonFan

    HerndonFan 2018 ROTY Poster Award Winner

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    A few more:
    Gerrymandering: When the primary is more competitive than the general election in many districts because of how they're drawn, there's a problem. This allows candidates to run further to the right or left and not have to take tough decisions.

    A House that's been stuck with 435 members for over a century: It's hard for Congressmen(and women) to represent the interests of hundreds of thousands of constituents.

    Compromise becoming a bad thing: Working across the aisle is seen as a sign of weakness and leads to the RINO and DINO label.

    The base having too much influence in candidate selection: These people whether it's Evangelicals or progressive activists have unrealistic and crazy demands.
     
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  14. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/25/opinion/black-lives-matter-corporations.html
     
  15. HomeoftheJets

    HomeoftheJets Well-Known Member

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  16. WarriorRB28

    WarriorRB28 Well-Known Member

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    I'm feeling opressed with the now seemingly constant threat of more stay at home imprisonment.
     
  17. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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    Let's see if this works...


    Are You Willing to Give Up Your Privilege?

    Philanthropy alone won’t save the American dream.
    By Darren Walker
    Mr. Walker is president of the Ford Foundation.

    I have lived on both sides of American inequality. I began life in the bottom 1 percent but found my way to the top. And I know, all too personally, that the distance between the two never has been greater.

    Last winter, at a black-tie gala — the kind of event where guests pay $100,000 for a table — I joined some of New York’s wealthiest philanthropists in an opulently decorated ballroom. I had the ominous sense that we were eating lobster on the Titanic.

    That evening, a billionaire who made his money in private equity delivered a soliloquy to me about America’s dazzling economic growth and record low unemployment among African-Americans in particular. I reminded him that many of these jobs are low-wage and dead-end, and that the proliferation of these very jobs is one reason that inequality is growing worse. He simply looked past me, over my shoulder.

    No chief executive, investor or rich person wakes up in the morning, looks in the mirror, and says, “Today, I want to go out and create more inequality in America.” And yet, all too often, that is exactly what happens.

    Even before the coronavirus, before the lockdowns, and before the murder of George Floyd — during the longest sustained economic expansion in American history — income inequality in America had reached staggering levels. Social mobility, the ability for a person to climb from poverty to security as I did, had all but disappeared.

    This contributes to a hopelessness and cynicism that undermines our shared ideals and institutions, pits us against one another, and drives communities further apart. That’s why I am worried about our democracy, deeply and for the first time in my life.

    I still believe in the American idea and in the values to which we have always aspired. Our nation’s generosity of spirit made my life’s journey possible. It was expressed through the public schools I attended, and government programs like Head Start and Pell grants that helped me, along with private philanthropy. Without them, I might have been ensnared in poverty or a structurally racist policing and criminal-justice system.

    So I feel a profound obligation to state what has become clearer every day: If we are to keep the American dream alive, our democratic values flourishing, and our market system strong, then we must redesign and rebuild the engine that drives them.

    Inequality in America was not born of the market’s invisible hand. It was not some unavoidable destiny. It was created by the hands and sustained effort of people who engineered benefits for themselves, to the detriment of everyone else. American inequality was decades in the making, one expensive lobbyist and policy change at a time. It will take a concerted effort to reverse all of this, and to remake America in the process.

    In recent weeks, I have been invited to join dozens of conversations with many well-intentioned chief executives and generous philanthropists to talk about what they should be doing during an upheaval that feels like 1918, 1932 and 1968 all at once. The irony is not lost on me: Many of those who are eagerly extending Zoom invitations are complicit in a system that desperately needs changing.

    I do see progress. I see business leaders like Marc Benioff, Ursula Burns, Ray Dalio, Paul Polman and others acknowledge that we conduct our daily work in a system built on unfair incentives. This system puts the interests of capital over labor, while it compounds privilege at the expense of opportunity.

    The boardroom elite are beginning to recognize that these unfairly structured incentives have grossly distorted our economy. I see an evolving understanding that our twisted economy is an existential threat that has pushed our republic to a breaking point.

    This awareness is necessary. But it is not sufficient.

    The old playbook — giving back through philanthropy as a way of ameliorating the effects of inequality — cannot heal what ails our nation. It cannot address the root causes of this inequality — what the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called “the circumstances of economic injustice which make philanthropy necessary.”

    Instead, those of us with power and privilege must grapple with a more profound question: What are we willing to give up?

    If we, the beneficiaries of a system that perpetuates inequality, are trying to reform this system that favors us, we will have to give up something. Here are a few of the special privileges and benefits we should be willing to surrender: the intricate web of tax policies that bolster our wealth; the entrenched system in American colleges of legacy admissions, which gives a leg up to our children; and above all, the expectation that, because of our money, we are entitled to a place at the front of the line.

    I spent the first part of my career on Wall Street, and I believe that capitalism is the best means of organizing an economy. But capitalism must be reformed if we are to save our democracy.

    This will require rejecting Milton Friedman’s outmoded ideology: the dogma that a company must put shareholder value above all other objectives. It will require that corporations operate, in the words of the Business Roundtable, “for the benefit of all stakeholders — customers, employees, suppliers, communities and shareholders.”

    Reforming capitalism also requires policymakers to transform a financial system that favors short-term returns, gives companies incentives to take on huge amounts of debt, and protects the special tax treatment for carried interest, a gift for private equity.

    We must further ask: How can we create new policies that advance long-term, sustainable investment? How do we encourage investment in people and their skills, not just in automation and robotics? What does it mean to write a tax code that reduces inequality?

    Too often, public policy does just the opposite: In 1982, a Securities and Exchange Commission rule allowed corporations to repurchase their stock. This created an environment in which companies accelerated their use of stock options and equity as forms of executive compensation, especially after the 2008 financial crisis. This has encouraged companies to increase share prices, at the expense of wages and benefits for workers, and created perverse incentives for companies to authorize buybacks. In 2018 alone, American companies spent more than $1 trillion repurchasing their own stock.

    Our economy is unbalanced because conscious choices, in the aggregate, amount to a conscienceless capitalism. These choices erode democracy and foment distrust. We, the people, can make different choices. And we, the wealthy and privileged, should lean in to our discomfort.

    This is the most pressing work of our time, and it will be difficult. Our present is deeply rooted in historical inequalities that must methodically be rectified.

    But difficulty is not an excuse to allow American capitalism to grow more distorted, corrupt and unjust. It does not relieve us of our duty to strengthen and improve a system that, if rebalanced, could once again make America a beacon for upward mobility.

    Without hope, American dreams deferred or denied will continue, as the poet Langston Hughes wrote, to explode. With hope, and through it, we can reimagine the dream and invite many millions more to share in its promise.
     
    #17 Acad23, Jun 26, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
  18. HomeoftheJets

    HomeoftheJets Well-Known Member

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    Redesign and rebuild the engine that drives them. Interesting plan. Now I have to figure out what it means...
     
  19. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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  20. Acad23

    Acad23 Well-Known Member

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    I fucked up the cut & paste. :confused:

    Fixed I believe...should make sense now.
     
    #20 Acad23, Jun 26, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
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