Jets Scouting Reports

Discussion in 'Draft' started by MaximusD163, Jun 10, 2022.

  1. MaximusD163

    MaximusD163 Well-Known Member

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    16. JAMIEN SHERWOOD | Auburn 6016 | 216 lbs. | JR. Jensen Beach, Fla. (Jensen Beach) 1/12/2000 (age 21.30) #20
    BACKGROUND: Jamien Sherwood grew up in southeastern Florida and started playing flag football at the age of 5. He attended Jensen Beach High School and became a starting safety on the varsity as a freshman, also playing quarterback, running back and receiver on offense. Sherwood posted 69 tackles and two interceptions as a junior, adding four punt returns for touchdowns. As a senior in 2017, he earned All-State and All-Area honors, finishing with 71 tackles and three interceptions. Sherwood also lettered in track at Jensen Beach, setting personal bests in the 100 meters (11.36) and 200 meters (22.83).
    A four-star recruit out of high school, Sherwood was the 21st-ranked safety in the 2018 class and the No. 47 recruit in the state of Florida. He started receiving offers
    as a sophomore and finished with almost 30. Sherwood had a final four of Auburn, Florida, Oregon and Michigan, committing to the Tigers and enrolling early in January 2018. He elected to skip his senior season and enter the 2021 NFL Draft.
    STRENGTHS: Muscular frame with exceptional arm length...outstanding eyes and recognition skills, understanding what the opponent wants to do...directs traffic pre- snap and gets his teammates lined up...anticipates routes, allowing him to break on passing lanes and undercut throws...physical at the point of attack to work off blocks and play through contact...patient enough footwork to avoid false steps and trust his vision...solid range for the position...missed tackles were few and far between on tape...widens his feet as an open-field tackler and stays under control downhill...his former coaches describe him as “old school” and “low maintenance” for his locked-in, all-ball attitude...was a full-time special-teamer all three years...durable and didn’t miss a game in his three seasons at Auburn.
    WEAKNESSES: Doesn’t play with burst or long speed...labors in his turn and run, allowing receivers or tight ends to gain a step vertically...gives up spacing in man- cover situations, hurting his ability to challenge throws at the catch point...needs to do a better job getting his head turned to find the football downfield...disappointing turnover production with no forced fumbles and only one career interception, which came as a freshman versus Alabama State...steady tackler, but not an enforcer and needs to better drive through his target...his collegiate resume has only 12 starts and feels incomplete.
    SUMMARY: A one-year starter at Auburn, Sherwood was a versatile safety in former defensive coordinator Kevin Steele’s 4-2-5 base scheme, lining up in the box, over the slot and in the deep half. The Tigers didn’t return any starters in the secondary in 2020, but he was a valuable reserve the previous two seasons and was ready for a leadership role as a junior. Sherwood is well built, physical and quickly sniffs out plays, which allows him to get a head start and wear different hats based on personnel packages. While his mental development helps him prevent some plays, you wish his college tape showed more turnover-worthy splash plays (one interception and zero forced fumbles in 37 career games). Overall, Sherwood lacks the sudden athleticism to be a reliable man-cover defender, but he plays with NFL-level anticipation, length and aggression. He projects as a special-teamer and borderline starter at box safety.
    GRADE: 5th-6th Round S16
     
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    42. MICHAEL CARTER II | Duke 5095 | 184 lbs. | SR. Douglasville, Ga. (South Paulding) 3/8/1999 (age 22.14) #26
    BACKGROUND: Michael Carter II attended South Paulding High School where he lettered in baseball and football, playing primarily at free safety. After posting 35 tackles as a sophomore, he led South Paulding to a 9-3 record and state playoff berth as a junior with 78 tackles, 10.0 tackles for loss and one interception, earning First Team All-County and All-Region honors. As a senior, Carter finished with 48 tackles, 7.0 tackles for loss, two interceptions and a pair of kickoff returns for touchdowns, earning 2016 County Defensive Player of the Year honors.
    A three-star safety recruit out of high school, Carter was the No. 55 ranked safety in the 2017 class and the No. 74 recruit in the state of Georgia. He picked up offers from programs like Clemson, North Carolina and Ole Miss, but he was drawn to Duke, signing with the Blue Devils. His father (Michael) played collegiate baseball at the University of New Orleans (1991-92). Carter graduated with his degree in public policy (December 2020). He received an invitation to the 2021 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl, but the event was canceled due to the pandemic.
    Missed one game due to injury Missed two games due to injury
    Third Team All-ACC; Team captain

    STRENGTHS: Quick-footed to slide and pedal...uses his read/react skills to drive on plays in front of him...above average closing ability, keying and staying ahead of plays...crowds receivers at the line in press and at the top of routes from off-coverage...squares ball carriers and grapples his target to finish in run support...competes with the gritty toughness needed for nickel work...walks the fine line of playing controlled and urgent...voted a team captain as a senior...versatile experience playing across the secondary, starting every game the last two seasons...his ball production improved each season...played on special teams coverages all four years.
    WEAKNESSES: Undersized and appears near his max playing weight...doesn’t play bigger than his listed measurables...finds himself off balance in his redirect, giving up separation when attempting to mirror routes...his straight-line speed is much faster than his recovery speed...inconsistent body position downfield and will lose phase...does a nice job squaring and lowering his pads as a run defender, but doesn’t drive through the ball carrier...will struggle to disengage once blockers get their mitts on him...credited with more touchdowns allowed (four) than turnovers forced (three) over the last two seasons.
    SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Duke, Carter was the slot defender in Duke’s defensive scheme, splitting his time between inside cornerback, outside cornerback and deep safety. The best known “Michael Carter” in the ACC the last few seasons played running back at North Carolina, but the Duke defensive back made a name for himself as well, logging 28 passes defended over his career. Carter is physically and mentally tough with the versatility on defense and special teams that will be attractive to NFL teams. His transitions will stall in man/off coverages and route speed will give him trouble. Overall, Carter is more smooth than sudden and doesn’t have an ideal size, but he has the athleticism and competitiveness to ride receivers, giving him a chance to compete for a slot corner role.
    GRADE: Priority Free Agent CB42
     
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    48. JASON PINNOCK | Pittsburgh 6004 | 204 lbs. | SR. Windsor, Conn. (Windsor) 6/30/1999 (age 21.83) #15
    Missed the season opener due to injury Missed three games due to injury
    Led team in INTs
    SUMMARY: Jason Pinnock played both ways as a wide receiver and cornerback at Windsor High School, finishing his senior year with 1,172 receiving yards, 15 total touchdowns (12 receiving, two fumbles, one interception) and seven interceptions. A three-star recruit, he initially committed to Boston College before flipping to Pitt. Despite not becoming a full-time starter until his senior year, Pinnock posted at least eight passes defended in each of his final three seasons in college. He is an impressive size/speed athlete, although his testing numbers don’t always translate to the football field. Pinnock can be late to recognize routes and play design and finds himself off balance in his transitions, but he catches himself to quickly recover and show off his ball skills. Overall, Pinnock has some feast-or-famine elements to his game, but he is a good-sized athlete with the necessary toughness and traits that will stand out in training camp (and on special teams coverages).
    GRADE: Priority Free Agent CB48
     
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    4. HAMSAH NASIRILDEEN | Florida State 6032 | 215 lbs. | SR. Concord, N.C. (Concord) 1/17/1999 (age 22.28) #23
    BACKGROUND: Hamsah Nasirildeen (Naz-ril-deen) grew up in Concord, N.C., a northern suburb of Charlotte, and was a four-year varsity starter in both basketball and football at Concord High School. A four-year starter at wide receiver, he didn’t play defense until his junior year, lining up at safety and posting 80 tackles and four interceptions in 2015. As a senior, Nasirildeen finished with 108 tackles and three interceptions, earning All-Conference honors for the second straight season. He was named First Team All-State and a U.S. Army All-American. On offense, he finished his prep career with 108 receptions for 1,728 receiving yards and nine touchdowns. As a junior wing on the basketball team, Nasirildeen led the team in points per game (14.0) and rebounds per game (9.3). He passed up the opportunity to enroll in college early to stay for his senior year of basketball, finishing his career with over 1,000 points.
    A four-star recruit out of high school, Nasirildeen was the No. 14-ranked safety in the 2017 class and the No. 1 recruit in the state of North Carolina. His dance list piled up with offers from Alabama, Clemson, Florida, Michigan and others. Nasirildeen initially committed to South Carolina at the start of his senior year before flipping to Florida State weeks before signing day. He accepted his invitation to the 2021 Senior Bowl.
    Led team in tackles
    Second Team All-ACC; Led team in tackles, FFs; Made 22 tackles at BC; INT TD; Injured knee in season finale Missed the first seven games of the season
    STRENGTHS: Sports an oversized, stretched-out frame with remarkable limb length...quick footed and coordinated in his transitions...downhill player who fills quickly and powerful at contact...makes form tackles when he can square up his target...strikes with the force to jar ball carriers and knock the ball loose (three forced fumbles on 2019 film)...improved awareness and took positive steps in coverage in 2019 (47.6% completion rate, zero touchdowns allowed) compared to 2018 (73.3%
    [245]

    completion rate, four touchdowns allowed)...shows off his wide receiver background when the ball is in the air...quiet personality, but coachable with reliable character (defensive coordinator Adam Fuller: “He asks key questions during meetings...he’s very much a team player”)...logged almost 500 career snaps on special teams at FSU...has experience at multiple positions and led the team in tackles in 2018 and 2019.
    WEAKNESSES: Position-fit concerns with his linebacker/safety tweener skill set...needs to eliminate the fly-by tackles...doesn’t consistently play through blockers with his eyes...needs to better anticipate blockers’ landmarks to play out in front...can be manipulated in deep coverage when he focuses more on the backfield than the wide receiver...late recovery skills to make up a lost step in man coverage...suffered a torn ACL in his left knee (November 2019), forcing him to return to school in 2020 and sit out the first seven games as a senior.
    SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Florida State, Nasirildeen played free safety in defensive coordinator Adam Fuller’s scheme, lining up in the deep half, versus the slot and at linebacker. Although his senior year was basically a lost season due to his ACL rehab, he led the Seminoles in tackles as a sophomore and junior and announced himself as a possible top-100 draft pick. Described as a “war daddy” by the FSU coaches, Nasirildeen runs the alleys with physicality and plays with the length and toughness to shed blocks in the box. In coverage, he has fluidity and ball skills, but his route anticipation and eye discipline are not currently strengths of his game. Overall, Nasirildeen comes with position-fit questions in base and requires a defined role, but he is a super-long, downhill force player with moldable physical traits. He projects as a hybrid box safety and core special-teamer.
    GRADE: 3rd Round (No. 93 overall) S4
     
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    36. BRANDIN ECHOLS | Kentucky 5101 | 179 lbs. | SR. Southaven, Miss. (Southaven) 10/16/1997 (age 23.54) #26
    BACKGROUND: Brandin Echols was born in Memphis and grew up 15 miles south in Southaven. He attended Southaven High School where he lettered in basketball, football and track. Echols was a do-everything player as a running back, wide receiver, defensive back and returner. As a senior, he finished with 906 rushing yards, 406 receiving yards and 12 offensive touchdowns, adding one interception and four return touchdowns. Echols was the leading scorer as a senior on the Southaven
    basketball team. He won the long jump state championship (23’3) in 2017, also setting personal-bests in the 100 meters (11.24) and 200 meters (22.10).
    Echols received FBS-level interest out of high school, but poor grades made his recruitment a non-starter. He attended Northwest Community College for two seasons, originally as a receiver before reluctantly switching to cornerback. Echols earned JUCO All-American status in 2018 with six interceptions and was a three- star JUCO recruit. He committed to Kentucky over Memphis and Minnesota for his final two seasons of eligibility. Echols graduated with his degree in community and leadership development (December 2020). He received an invitation to the 2021 East-West Shrine Bowl, but the event was canceled due to the pandemic.
    YEAR (GP/GS) TKLS TFL SACK FF PD INT NOTES
    Northwest Community College (Miss.) Northwest Community College (Miss.)


    STRENGTHS: Elite testing numbers at pro day...outstanding speed when he can unlock and run...adequate footwork to plant, gather and go...uses his lateral agility to slide-and-ride receivers from press...can recognize route development from zone...flashes a closing burst when jumping routes...protects against deep routes...his competitive toughness is unquestioned...plays with an edge and doesn’t allow wide receivers to push him around...nice job with outside run leverage to be a factor in the run game.
    WEAKNESSES: Lean build with only average arm length...unpolished technique...clunky pedal and often caught on his heels, hindering his ability to drive in the quick game...inconsistent transition technique at the top of routes, leading to spatial issues...inconsistent eye discipline and his vision can be caught in the wrong place...lacks ideal play strength and spends too much time hand-fighting with receivers...questionable ball-hawking instincts (only one interception in his two seasons in the SEC)...will be a 24-year old NFL rookie.
    SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Kentucky, Echols was the field cornerback in head coach Mark Stoops’ zone/man scheme. After an All-American stint at the JUCO level, he held his own in the SEC with 12 passes defended and four touchdowns allowed over 24 games. An offensively-focused player most of his life, Echols is still relatively new to cornerback and it shows with his inconsistent technique and eye discipline. He is a physical competitor, which shows vs. the pass and the run, and offers special teams value. Overall, Echols lacks a great feel for route depth and plays too much on his heels, but he can survive in both man and zone and is still developing. He projects as a practice squad candidate with upside due to his athletic traits.
    GRADE: 7th Round CB36
     
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    14. JONATHAN MARSHALL | Arkansas 6031 | 310 lbs. | rSR. Shepherd, Texas (Shepherd) 9/16/1997 (age 23.62) #42
    BACKGROUND: Jonathan Marshall grew up in the small country town of Shepherd (population 2,300; 60 miles north of Houston) and saw varsity reps as a freshman at Shepherd High School. Playing defensive end and tackle on defense, he also lined up at running back and tight end on offense. After posting 22.0 tackles for loss and 5.0 sacks as a sophomore, Marshall collected 71 tackles, 21.0 tackles for loss and 10.0 sacks as a junior which earned him Second Team All-District honors. As a senior, he earned Second Team All-State honors and was the district MVP on defense, also leading the team in rushing in 2015. Marshall was a four-year letterman in basketball and surpassed the 1,000-point plateau. He also finished fifth in the 2016 state championship in the shot put while setting the school record (54’0.75).
    A three-star defensive end recruit out of high school, Marshall was the No. 30 strongside defensive end in the 2016 class and the No. 95 recruit in Texas. He originally committed to Oklahoma State (as a defensive lineman and tight end) over Nebraska and TCU, but a late visit to Arkansas led to him flipping and signing with the Razorbacks. His cousin (Cedric Reed) played defensive end at Texas and played two seasons in the NFL (2015-16). He is related to Cedrick Hardman, who was a first- round defensive end (No. 9 overall) in the 1970 NFL Draft, playing 12 seasons in the NFL and winning a Super Bowl in 1981. Marshall graduated with his degree in recreation and sport management.

    NOTES
    Team captain

    STRENGTHS: Excellent athleticism, speed and body control for his size...quick out of his stance to play ahead of move blocks...able to work down the line before bursting through the gap...flashes the power in his upper body to stack and toss blockers from his path...drives centers into the pocket when he correctly times up the snap...played multiple positions in Arkansas’ even/odd front...voted one of four team captains in 2020...quiet personality and won’t rock the boat (NFL scout: “The coaches say he’s the strongest guy they have and also one of the most dependable”)...has not yet played his best football.
    WEAKNESSES: Struggles to anchor his spot and can be moved, especially against down blocks...inconsistent results when attempting to leverage gaps...his awareness of blocking schemes is undeveloped...head ducker into contact and needs to refine his take-on technique...appeared to wear down on tape with his legs going lifeless at contact and laying on blocks...doesn’t have great length...uninspiring set up and execution as a pass rusher...only a one-year starter and lacks the statistical resume desired for a player who will turn 24 years old as an NFL rookie.
    SUMMARY: A one-year starter at Arkansas, Marshall lined up at nose tackle in defensive coordinator Barry Odom’s three-man front. After spending most of his career in Fayetteville as a reserve, he earned a starting role as a senior, but was out of position as a nose and easily fatigued after getting beaten up by double teams. Marshall has an impressive combination of athleticism and strength and the coaches go out of their way to talk up his character. But his inexperience shows on tape as he struggles to leverage the point of attack and needs to better weaponize his hands (played under four different defensive coordinators at Arkansas, which stunted his development). Overall, Marshall flashes explosive movements and spurts of power, but you want to see it more consistently and he requires further coaching to streamline his talent. He projects as a draft-and-develop three-technique tackle.
    GRADE: 6th Round IDL14
     
    #26 MaximusD163, Jun 10, 2022
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2022
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    1. AHMAD GARDNER | Cincinnati 6026 | 190 lbs. | JR.
    Detroit, Mich. (Martin Luther King) 8/31/2000 (age 21.66)
    BACKGROUND: Ahmad “Sauce” Gardner, who is the youngest of three children, was born and raised in Detroit by his mother (Alisa). He started playing football at age 6 for the East Side Bengals (at running back) and quickly developed a love for the game. Gardner attended Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High in downtown Detroit and didn’t see much varsity action as an undersized wide receiver (5-8, 140 pounds) as a freshman and sophomore. He moved up to varsity full time as a junior receiver but became a starting cornerback midseason after a teammate broke his jaw (October 2017). As a two-way player as a senior, Gardner led King to a 12-2 record and the 2018 Division 3 state championship at Ford Field (caught two touchdown passes in the title game). He earned First Team All-State honors as a senior cornerback. Gardner also lettered in track (sprints and relays) and set a personal best of 11.50 in the 100 meters.

    A three-star recruit out of high school, Gardner was the No. 163 cornerback in the 2019 recruiting class and the No. 41 recruit in the state of Michigan. With minimal varsity tape at cornerback and his slender 160-pound frame, he wasn’t highly recruited, even by in-state programs like Michigan and Michigan State. Gardner received his first offer from Toledo and finished with more than a dozen offers, including a few Power 5 programs such as Indiana, Iowa State and Kentucky. But he forged a connection with Cincinnati coaches Luke Fickell and Marcus Freeman and signed with the Bearcats. His older brother (Allante) was a wide receiver and running back at Division II Saginaw Valley State (2012-16) and Division III Lakeland (2017). Gardner elected to skip his senior season and enter the 2022 NFL Draft.
    Freshman All-American; First Team All-AAC; 2 INT TDs (62-yard, 16-yard returns); Led team in PD First Team All-American; First Team All-AAC; Missed bowl game with back injury
    Consensus All-American; AAC Defensive POY; First Team All-AAC; Blocked FG TD
    STRENGTHS: Tall, stretched-out athlete ... light-footed pedal and turn and his hip flip is unforced ... long gait helps him stay in-phase and stay stride for stride with receivers ... accelerates in a blink to recover in coverage or drive underneath ... poised in press and extends his long arms into receivers ... above-average on-ball production (nine career interceptions with two pick-sixes) ... makes catch-point adjustments like a former wide receiver ... uses the sideline wisely to cut off routes ... competitive play personality shows in run support and against physical pass catchers ... exudes confidence and doesn’t apologize for being flashy (celebrates his “Sauce” nickname, which was given to him at age 6 by his youth football coach) ... his coaches say he raises the temperature in the room with his exuberant personality but also holds teammates accountable ... missed only one game the last three seasons (37 games played) ... influenced offensive game plans as quarterbacks looked elsewhere (saw only 2.9 targets per game in 2021 and didn’t give up a 20-plus yard reception).
    WEAKNESSES: Sleek, lean-limbed body type and play strength is below average ... occasionally finds himself upright in his movements, leaving him late to react to shifty route runners ... has moments of panic downfield that lead to excessive contact when he doesn’t trust his ball skills ... penalized nine times the last two seasons (seven pass-interference or defensive holding calls) ... can do a better job with his tackling foundation to be a more reliable finisher in the run game ... durability isn’t a concern, but missed the 2020 bowl game with a back injury (December 2020).
    SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Cincinnati, Gardner was the boundary cornerback in defensive coordinator Mike Tressel’s man-heavy scheme. Despite marginal experience as a full-time cornerback in high school, he put his name on the NFL radar as a freshman and earned All-America status each of his three college seasons, becoming the first non-specialist to earn Consensus All-America honors in school history. Gardner is a long-bodied, athletic cover man who does a great job staying on top of routes to force quarterbacks to look elsewhere (saw only 11.0 percent of the defensive targets in 2021). He shows better poise at the line of scrimmage than downfield, but he plays fearlessly and has the disruptive skills to make plays on the ball when challenged (zero touchdown passes allowed in 1,103 career coverage snaps in college). Overall, Gardner needs to continue developing his play strength, but he is a sticky bump-and-run corner with the athletic instincts to stay in phase and smother receivers. Cincinnati hasn’t produced an NFL first-round pick since 1971, but that will soon change with Gardner.
    GRADE: 1st Round (No. 5 overall) CB1
     
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    1. GARRETT WILSON | Ohio State 5116 | 183 lbs. | JR. Austin, Texas (Lake Travis) 7/22/2000 (age 21.77) #5
    BACKGROUND: Garrett Wilson, who is one of five children, grew up in Dublin, Ohio (northwest suburb of Columbus), where he won multiple youth football titles as a quarterback and starred on the AAU circuit in basketball (his favorite sport). In the sixth grade, his family moved to Austin, Texas, because of his father’s job, and Wilson attended Hudson Bend Middle School. After enrolling at Lake Travis High (alma mater of Baker Mayfield), he played varsity as a freshman wide receiver and was one of the team’s top weapons as a sophomore, finishing with 53 catches for 699 yards and 12 touchdowns in 2016. Wilson had a prolific junior season with 98 receptions for 1,774 yards and 26 touchdowns (32 touchdowns total) and was named the 2017-18 Central Texas Athlete of the Year. He missed six weeks as a senior because of a minor back injury, but still finished the 2018 season with 1,151 receiving yards and 19 touchdowns. Wilson was named a U.S. Army All-American and finished his prep career with 204 catches for 3,359 yards and 55 total touchdowns. He was a three-year member of the Lake Travis varsity basketball team and earned First Team All-Central Texas honors as a junior, averaging 21.0 points per game (didn’t play as a senior because he enrolled early at Ohio State). Wilson also lettered in track and set personal bests in the 100 meters (11.39) and long jump (21’5.25).
    A five-star recruit out of high school, Wilson was the No. 2 wide receiver in the 2019 recruiting class (No. 20 player overall) and the No. 3 recruit in the state of Texas (behind OL Kenyon Green and DL DeMarvin Leal). He had no shortage of suitors, with over 30 major offers before narrowing his list to two, choosing his old home (Ohio State) over his new home (Texas) and enrolling in January 2019. Wilson also received scholarship offers from several Division I basketball programs (he would have pursued basketball if he was bigger). His father (Kenny) played collegiate basketball at Davidson (1981-84) and is in the school’s Hall of Fame, ranking seventh in program history in points (1,573). Kenny played briefly with the NBA’s Denver Nuggets. His older brother (Cameron) played wide receiver at Iowa (2012-13) and Ohio (2014) before legal troubles. His older brother (Donovan) played running back at Bowling Green (2013-17). Wilson elected to skip his senior season, including the Rose Bowl, and enter the 2022 NFL Draft.
    NOTES
    First Team All-Big Ten
    First Team All-American; Second Team All-Big Ten; Rush TD; Missed one game (injury); Skipped bowl game
    STRENGTHS: Elite body control and ball skills to make fluid midair adjustments ... explosive twitch in release package ... defenders better get their hands on him quickly, because he has the short-area explosion to create separation in tight spaces ... rare understanding of route leverage for his age ... snatches without breaking stride and instinctively sets up his cuts ... decelerates on command to give tacklers the slip ... plays bigger than he is, and shows the reflexes and contortion skills to win when covered (impressive 61.8 percent success rate in contested situations) ... physical with the ball in the air to high-point with his long arms, strong hands and terrific hand-eye coordination ... responsible for four plays of 50-plus yards (three receptions, one rush) in 2021 ... punt return experience, averaging 5.9 yards per return (35/205/0) ... impressive competitor with the intangibles desired for the next level (NFL scout: “The OSU coaches say he carried himself with the demeanor and work ethic of a professional when he was a freshman.”) ... played primarily in the slot in 2020 and outside in 2021 ... production improved each season, and he leaves Columbus ranked top-10 in school history in receptions, receiving yards and receiving touchdowns.
    WEAKNESSES: Has a slender, lean-muscled frame and lacks ideal body mass ... loose route runner, and needs to be sharper with his body movements and footwork ... plays physical but not powerful, and needs to continue improving his functional strength to fend off aggressive NFL cornerbacks ... average sustain skills as a perimeter blocker ... for a player with tremendous ball skills, drops too many easy passes ... build will lead to durability questions; missed one game as a junior because of concussion-like symptoms (November 2021); missed more than a month of senior year in high school because of a back injury (October 2018).
    SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Ohio State, Wilson was the X receiver in head coach Ryan Day’s multiple spread offense, lining up primarily outside in 2021 after spending 2020 in the slot. Despite never leading Ohio State in receiving in any of his three seasons, his production increased each year, and he was one of only six FBS pass catchers to average more than 95.0 receiving yards and 1.0 touchdown per game in 2021. A Division I basketball recruit out of high school, Wilson credits basketball (his favorite sport) for developing the route athleticism and fluidity in and out of his breaks that makes him a true three-level threat on the football field. With his long arms and uncanny adjustment skills, he catches the ball well outside his frame and is comfortable operating with bodies around him. Overall, Wilson needs continued route refinement, but he makes the playbook come alive with his ability to get open before and after the catch thanks to his athleticism and instincts. With his slender frame, elite body control, and catch-point skills, he reminds me of CeeDee Lamb.
    GRADE: 1st Round (No. 10 overall) WR1
     
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    4. JERMAINE JOHNSON | Florida State 6045 | 254 lbs. | rSR. Eden Prairie, Minn. (Eden Prairie) 1/8/1999 (age 23.31) #11
    BACKGROUND: Jermaine Johnson II grew up in the Minneapolis suburbs and attended Eden Prairie High. He played three years of varsity football as a defensive lineman and wide receiver while also lettering in basketball and track. As a senior, Johnson recorded 267 receiving yards and six touchdown catches on offense and 82 tackles, 15.0 tackles for loss and 10.0 sacks in 2016.
    A three-star recruit out of high school, Johnson was the No. 105 weakside defensive end in the 2017 recruiting class and the No. 11 recruit in the state of Minnesota. He received interest from Louisville and nearby Minnesota, but his poor academics (1.9 GPA) prevented Division I programs from offering him a scholarship (Johnson: “I didn’t handle what I was supposed to. It was just bad grades and making bad decisions.”). In 2017, Johnson enrolled at Independence Community College in southeastern Kansas, where he was featured on the Netflix series ‘Last Chance U,’ and produced 12.5 sacks over two seasons. A four-star JUCO recruit, Johnson was the No. 1 JUCO recruit in the 2019 recruiting class and received offers from Oregon, Texas and USC before committing to Georgia. Looking for more playing time, he entered the transfer portal after two seasons in Athens and signed with Florida State, where he took advantage of the NCAA’s extra year of eligibility rule because of the pandemic. His older brother (Vadell) played wide receiver at Independence Community College. Johnson accepted his invitation to the 2022 Senior Bowl.
    Independence Community College (Kan.)Independence Community College (Kan.)

    Georgia
    Georgia
    Florida State; ACC Defensive POY; First Team All-ACC; Led ACC in TFL, sacks, FFs; Team captain
    STRENGTHS: Prototypical frame and length ... uses his lateral agility and strong hands in chorus to sidestep blockers and capture the corner ... his go-to moves are a powerful swipe/rip and timely long-arm stab ... plays behind his strong punch and lets his long arms work for him as a pass rusher ... stride length keeps blockers on their toes ... alert and physical in the run game ... takes accurate pursuit angles with an open-field burst to close ... able to retrace and find the football ... hit, lift, drive tackler and uses his length to lasso ball carriers in space ... plays with outstanding effort, and the added snaps as a senior weren’t too much for him (defensive snaps jumped from 27.0 per game in 2020 to 61.3 in 2021) ... teammates call him a “first in, last out” and “right attitude” type of guy ... highly productive senior season with Florida State, leading the ACC in tackles for loss and sacks (also led all Power 5 defensive linemen in tackles).
    WEAKNESSES: Upright, high-cut athlete ... tall center of gravity disrupts his balance and change of direction skills ... average burst to start and average fluidity to finish ... needs to introduce more trickery in his rush plan ... eagerness to get his hands involved leads to wasted, inefficient movements ... piled up the sacks in 2021, but his pass rush win rate (14.1 percent) was mediocre ... can get caught playing high in the run game ... must improve shed tactics once locked up ... only one season as a full-time starter at the FBS level.
    SUMMARY: A one-year starter at Florida State, Johnson lined up as the field defensive end in defensive coordinator Adam Fuller’s four-man front. Considered a key member of Georgia’s front-seven (third on the team in sacks in 2020), he bet on himself by transferring to Tallahassee to be a full-time starter, and he responded with a career year in 2021, including an ACC-best 18.0 tackles for loss and 12.0 sacks. Johnson is a long, athletic edge defender with the quick feet and natural instincts to win as a pass rusher and make stops vs. the run. Although he can be too segmented and upright in his rush attack, his motor runs hot, and his swipe/rip/stab moves are angry. Overall, Johnson has average get-off, but his length, agility and active hands lead to disruption as both a pass rusher and run defender. He projects as an every-down NFL starter.
    GRADE: 1st Round (No. 11 overall) ED4
     
  10. MaximusD163

    MaximusD163 Well-Known Member

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    2. BREECE HALL | Iowa State 5112 | 217 lbs. | JR. Wichita, Kan. (Northwest) 5/31/2001 (age 20.91) #28
    BACKGROUND: Breece Hall, who has an older sister, grew up in Omaha with his mother (LaRhonda McDaniel) before the family moved to Wichita in 2010. He focused on basketball and football growing up and played both at Northwest High School. After spending most of his sophomore year on the JV team, Hall had a breakout junior season with 2,082 rushing yards (10.3 yards per carry) and 32 touchdowns, adding 12 catches for 130 yards and two touchdowns. As a senior, he earned First Team All-State and All-Metro honors for the second consecutive year, helping the program to a 12-1 record and runner-up finish in Class 5A. Hall finished his senior season with 2,127 rushing yards and 29 touchdowns and 20 catches for 588 yards and eight touchdowns in 2018. He finished his prep career with 4,516 rushing yards. Hall also lettered in basketball at Northwest.
    A four-star recruit out of high school, Hall was the No. 22 running back in the 2019 recruiting class and the No. 2 recruit in the state of Kansas (QB Graham Mertz was No. 1). With little varsity action until his junior year, he went widely overlooked as a recruit until Iowa State found his tape and offered him midway through his junior year. The secret was out as offers from Kansas State, Michigan, Ole Miss and others soon followed. But Hall embraced the culture fit and relationship with the Cyclones’ coaching staff, choosing Iowa State over Nebraska (and enrolled early). His stepfather (Jeff Smith) was a running back at Nebraska and was drafted in the 10th round of the 1985 NFL Draft, playing four seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs and Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Hall wears No. 28 because of Smith). His cousin (Roger Craig) played 11 seasons in the NFL (1983-93) and won three Super Bowls with the San Francisco 49ers. His cousin (Hunter Sallis) was a five-star guard in the 2021 basketball recruiting class and signed with Gonzaga. Hall elected to skip his final season and the 2021 bowl game to enter the 2022 NFL Draft.

    Second Team All-Big 12; Enrolled in January 2019
    Consensus First Team All-American; Big 12 Offensive POY; Led FBS in rushing yards Consensus First Team All-American; Big 12 Offensive POY; Led Big 12 in rushing

    STRENGTHS: Well-distributed body mass built to handle the load ... skilled at forcing missed tackles with his lateral agility and vision ... able to slam on the brakes and smoothly redirect his cuts ... his blocking scheme patience usually pays off for him, allowing the point of entry to develop ... impressive play strength through congestion ... drops his pads and finishes with contact balance, not making it easy on tacklers ... smooth body control as a pass catcher to adjust and pull in erratic throws ... gutsy in pass protection with the poise and power to get better ... low fumble rate, putting the ball on the ground once every 200 offensive touches in college ... already carries himself like a pro and competes with an overachieving mindset (head coach Matt Campbell: “He has always been ready for the moment.”) ... finished his career with 11 school records, including scoring (338), total touchdowns (56) and rushing touchdowns (50).
    WEAKNESSES: His impressive stopwatch speed doesn’t always show on tape ... average suddenness and doesn’t have multiple gears under the hood ... inconsistent pressing the line of scrimmage ... he is more of a screen target than proven route runner, and needs further development with his route tempo/depth ... he will cut or chest up blockers in pass protection and needs to develop his hand use ... his competitive urgency is much more impressive as a runner than blocker.
    SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Iowa State, Hall was entrenched as the starter since his freshman year in offensive coordinator Tom Manning’s zone scheme. Overlooked as a high school recruit, Hall quickly established himself as one of college football’s top ball carriers (finished top-10 in the Heisman voting as a sophomore and junior), setting an FBS record with a rushing touchdown in 24 consecutive games. Hall, who is Iowa State’s all-time leading scorer, has a strong understanding of his strengths as a player and is a disciplined athlete by nature. He posted outstanding testing numbers, but there are times on tape you wish he showed more of an escape gear. Overall, Hall has room to improve as a blocker and pass catcher and he doesn’t consistently play up to his testing numbers, but he runs with outstanding patience, vision and athletic footwork to be a starting-caliber back in the NFL. He projects best in a zone-based scheme (inside or outside).

    GRADE: 2nd Round (No. 41 overall) RB2
     
  11. MaximusD163

    MaximusD163 Well-Known Member

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    3. JEREMY RUCKERT | Ohio State 6054 | 252 lbs. | SR. Lindenhurst, N.Y. (Lindenhurst) 8/11/2000 (age 21.71) #88
    BACKGROUND: Jeremy Ruckert, who is the oldest of two boys, was born and raised in Lindenhurst (located on the southern shore of Long Island). Soccer was his go- to sport growing up and he was a standout goalkeeper on club teams through middle school and into high school. After he enrolled at Lindenhurst High, Ruckert switched his focus to football and played both ways as a wide receiver on offense and linebacker on defense. He earned First Team All-Long Island honors each of his final three seasons and had his best year as a senior, leading Lindenhurst to a 12-0 record and the school’s first state title in 2017. Ruckert finished his senior year with 61 catches for 1,094 yards and 13 touchdowns and was named First Team All-USA Today and New York’s Gatorade State Player of the Year. He added 61 tackles, 13.0 sacks and two interceptions as a senior on defense. Ruckert finished his prep career with 222 receptions for 3,133 yards and 37 touchdowns.
    A four-star recruit out of high school, Ruckert was the No. 2 tight end in the 2018 recruiting class (behind Brevin Jordan) and the No. 1 recruit in the state of New York. Every major college program (Alabama, LSU, Texas, etc.) offered him a scholarship, but he narrowed his final choice to Michigan, Notre Dame, Ohio State and Wisconsin. The summer before his senior year, Ruckert committed to Urban Meyer and the Buckeyes. His younger brother (Will) is a rising junior defensive lineman at Division-III SUNY Cortland. Ruckert graduated with his degree in human development and family sciences (August 2021). He accepted his invitation to the 2022 Senior Bowl, but missed the second half of the week after suffering a foot injury.

    Honorable Mention All-Big Ten
    STRENGTHS: Large, strong hands and routinely catches outside his frame ... remarkable hand-eye coordination and trains his brain speed to master his ball-catching focus ... average long-speed, but accelerates quickly with his first step ... shows patience and flexibility at the stem and is a stickler for route details ... won’t shrink vs. physical coverage ... has the frame to bounce off tackle attempts ... physical appetite as a blocker and blows up backside defenders ... unselfish player and embraced his role in the OSU offense ... the Buckeyes strength staff says he is “never satisfied” with his improvements and doesn’t have an “unmotivated bone in his body” ... scored a touchdown every 4.5 catches in college ... finished his career second all-time in school history in touchdowns catches (12) by a tight end ... durable college career (47 games played) and stayed off the injury list.
    WEAKNESSES: Hard-charging blocker, but his overaggressive mentality often leaves him off-balance ... shorter arms and struggles to break down as an on-the-move blocker ... a high school wide receiver who is still learning pass protection angles ... limited route tree in college ... sets up his routes well, his separation is average ... unproven attacking the downfield seam – only eight career targets (five catches) on throws that traveled 20-plus yards in the air ... only one career catch over 30 yards ... lacks elusive qualities and non-threatening after the catch (averaged only 4.8 YAC per reception in his career) ... lackluster receiving production and never had more than 57 yards in a single game in college (only two games above 50 yards receiving) ... suffered plantar fasciitis to his left foot at the Senior Bowl and was sidelined for the Combine.
    SUMMARY: A one-year starter at Ohio State, Ruckert worked primarily inline and in the slot in head coach Ryan Day’s offense (mostly “11” personnel). He played 714 offensive snaps as a senior, but the tight end position in OSU’s offense is used mostly as a blocker or decoy as he saw only 39 targets in 2021 (3.0 targets per game) after totaling only 34 targets his first three years combined. An athletic big man, Ruckert was a standout soccer goalie growing up, which helped develop his ball skills on the football field, showing the toughness and concentration to finish catches through contact. He fires out of his stance as a blocker, but often to the detriment of his balance, struggling to establish point-of-attack leverage. Overall, Ruckert must become a more consistent blocker, but he is a strong-willed athlete and ball- winner who can make natural adjustments because of his flexibility and focus. He is a strong candidate to be a better pro than college player with a skill set reminiscent of Adam Trautman.
    GRADE: 3rd Round (No. 85 overall) TE3
     
  12. MaximusD163

    MaximusD163 Well-Known Member

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    14. MAX MITCHELL | Louisiana 6062 | 307 lbs. | SR. Monroe, La. (Neville) 10/12/1999 (age 22.54) #74
    BACKGROUND: Max Mitchell grew up in Monroe in northern Louisiana and attended Neville High. He was undersized as a freshman (6-2, 165 pounds) and played primarily on junior varsity as a sophomore and junior offensive lineman. Mitchell continued to grow and develop, moving up to varsity as a senior (6-5, 270 pounds), where he started at right tackle and right guard, leading Neville to an 8-4 record and earning a spot in the 2017 Louisiana I-20 Bowl East-West All Star Game.
    A two-star offensive tackle recruit out of high school, Mitchell was the No. 244 offensive tackle in the 2018 recruiting class and the No. 124 recruit in the state of Louisiana. He went overlooked by FBS programs, including his hometown UL-Monroe, and received scholarship offers from lower-level programs like Northwestern State (FCS), Arkansas-Monticello (Division II) and Ouachita Baptist (Division II). But with newly hired head coach Billy Napier patching together his first recruiting class at Louisiana, he and offensive line coach Rob Sale liked what they saw with Mitchell and gave him his only FBS scholarship offer. After his senior season, he opted out of the Ragin’ Cajuns’ bowl game and accepted his invitation to the 2022 Senior Bowl.
    Rotated in and out at LT and played near starter-level snaps
    Second Team All-Sun Belt; Missed one game due to COVID-19 contact tracing (didn’t test positive) First Team All-Sun Belt; Opted out of the bowl game
    STRENGTHS: Light mover and keeps his feet underneath him in his pass sets ... has the body control to adjust to moving targets ... keeps his hands quiet, tight and on time ... mixes up his hand tactics to keep rushers from getting a read on him ... does a great job knocking away the wrists of rushers ... continues to drive his feet at contact in the run game to generate movement ... has the mobility to pull, trap or stalk and stun at the second level (played in a zone-blocking scheme all four seasons) ... tough-minded competitor whose confidence grows each season ... was weight deficient for a lineman throughout high school and worked hard with his nutrition and strength training in college ... willingly switched positions when asked ... durable and didn’t miss a game due to injury in college.
    WEAKNESSES: Needs to continue adding mass and developing his play strength ... inconsistent anchor and will have trouble versus power ... gets himself in trouble when he stops his lateral slide and tries to simply push rushers wide of the pocket ... needs to deliver more of a thump on the move ... struggles to sustain versus power in the run game ... his base narrows as a drive blocker and he tends to lose balance when attempting to overcompensate ... needs to show better consistency at the second level ... has some experience at left tackle but appears much more comfortable at right tackle.
    SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Louisiana, Mitchell lined up primarily at right tackle in former head coach Billy Napier’s zone-heavy offense. With only one season of starting experience on varsity in high school, he could have used a redshirt in college but was thrown into the fire and learned from eventual NFL draft picks Robert Hunt and Kevin Dotson. Mitchell moves well and has steadily gotten better with his technique the last three seasons, specifically with his landmarks and hand exchange. Somewhat of a late bloomer physically, he can be jostled at contact and his lack of base/core strength shows on tape. Overall, Mitchell was a below-
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    average tester and needs to continue developing his strength, but his play quickness is an asset in pass protection and as a zone run blocker. He does a great job reestablishing his hands mid-block. He isn’t ready made for the NFL, but he the potential is there for him to grow into a swing tackle role.
    GRADE: 4th-5th Round OT14
     
  13. MaximusD163

    MaximusD163 Well-Known Member

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    25. MICHEAL CLEMONS | Texas A&M 6052 | 263 lbs. | rSR. Garland, Texas (Sachse) 8/21/1997 (age 24.69) #2
    BACKGROUND: Micheal Clemons attended Sachse High in Garland, a northeast suburb of Dallas. Behind Devine Ozigbo and Devin Duvernay, Sachse went 11-1 his junior season in 2013, but Clemons, an undersized running back (160 pounds), didn’t see significant playing time and spent time away from the team as he was trying to transfer to a school in Oklahoma. As a senior at Sachse, Clemons switched to defense and was a projected starting linebacker, but he tore his groin in the first game and missed most of the 2014 season.
    A no-star recruit out of high school, Clemons didn’t have much film, and colleges had no reason to pursue him as a serious prospect. Based on a recommendation, the coaches at Cisco Community College took a chance on the injured running back and linebacker. Clemons spent his redshirt season in 2015 rehabbing his injury, hitting the weights (added 40 pounds), and transitioning to defensive end. As a redshirt freshman in 2016, he posted 30 tackles, 8.5 tackles for loss and 2.5 sacks in six games and drew the attention of several Power 5 programs. A three-star junior college recruit, Clemons was the No. 3 strongside defensive end in the 2017 recruiting class (behind Isaiah Buggs and Javon Kinlaw) and received scholarship offers from Auburn, Missouri, Ole Miss, Tennessee and others, but with Texas A&M sending Myles Garrett and Daeshon Hall to the NFL, he saw a great opportunity with the Aggies. Clemons graduated with his undergraduate degree (August 2019). He took advantage of the extra year of eligibility by the NCAA and returned for his fifth season at Texas A&M in 2021 (after two seasons at the juco level). Clemons accepted his invitation to the 2022 Senior Bowl.
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    2015: Cisco Community College 2016: Cisco Community College
    NOTES
    Redshirted
    Texas A&M
    Texas A&M; Missed season with a foot injury
    Texas A&M; Missed two games because of injury
    Texas A&M; Missed the final five games because of injury
    Texas A&M; Team captain; 24-yard FR TD; Suspended for the season opener
    STRENGTHS: A fully-developed man with prototypical measurements and cut -vantage ... connects with strong, active hands and transitions well off his initial strike ... noticeable burst and bend to wrap the outside shoulder of the tackle ... stays home as a run defender and sets a physical edge ... no concerns about his motor on tape ... named a senior captain, and the Texas A&M coaches are quick to point out his leadership and the adversities he has overcome (head coach Jimbo Fisher: “He puts his heart and soul into everything he does.”) ... had a productive senior season with 11.0 tackles for loss in 10 games.
    WEAKNESSES: His hands are active and heavy but often out of control and mistimed ... lacks diversity in his rush setup and attack ... his lack of counter measures will stall his pass rush ... slow off the snap and must improve his first step anticipation ... will get tall in the run game and must improve his run game leverage to strengthen his anchor ... more missed tackles on tape than you want to see for a player with his length and power ... over-aged and will be 25 before his first NFL game ... his extensive injury history is a red flag, including a foot injury (August 2018) that led to him redshirting in 2018 and ankle surgery (November 2020) that sidelined him for the second half of the 2020 season ... his off-field decision-making deserves scrutiny after he was arrested twice in a three-month span in 2021: arrested and charged (August 2021) with unlawful carrying of a weapon, failure to identify/giving false information, less than two ounces of marijuana possession, and driving with an invalid license; he was previously arrested (May 2021) for driving with an invalid license.
    SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Texas A&M, Clemons lined up at defensive end in former defensive coordinator Mike Eklo’s four-man front. He spent seven years at the college level (five in College Station, two at junior college) and battled several injuries. But he enjoyed a productive senior season (at 24 years old) with 11.0 tackles for loss in 10 games, including a 3.5-sack performance in the season finale vs. LSU. With his frame, length, and athleticism, Clemons is straight out of central casting and at his best using his forward lean and strike power to create leverage points and open his rush opportunities. A late bloomer, he didn’t play defensive end until junior college, and he is still developing his hand use and discovering how to unlock all of his talent. Overall, Clemons has several red flags (age, injury history, off-field decision-making), but he owns NFL physical traits with the functional strength vs. the run and speed-to-power rush skills to handle edge responsibilities. He projects as a rotational NFL end who can play in either even or odd fronts (his flashes are reminiscent of Darrell Taylor at Tennessee).
    GRADE: 5th Round ED25
     
  14. REVISion

    REVISion Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for posting all these. They are quite detailed.

    Quinnen has to be one of the more severe instances of groupthink warping perception that I can recall for any prospect over the last few years. I don't know who overrated him first but I do know that once people started overrating him everyone started overrated him. The general consensus was that he was a sure thing and had a good shot at being a Donald-caliber interior player.

    That's not to say Quinnen was a bad prospect, he was a pretty good one. But he should've been drafted in the 10-15+ range at least, not been in discussion as BPA of the draft and a surefire pro bowler.
     
  15. Ralebird

    Ralebird Well-Known Member

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    How much time does he get to prove you wrong, or is he already out of time?
     
  16. REVISion

    REVISion Well-Known Member

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    It's not impossible for him to make a leap from here but a guy usually is who he is after 3 years.
     

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