Rip Dwight Clark

Discussion in 'National Football League' started by FJF, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. FJF

    FJF 2018 MVP Joe Namath Award Winner

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    61, ALS got him too early

    One of the most iconic plays in nfl history .
     
  2. jetophile

    jetophile Bruce Coslet's Daughter

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    I was just about to post this. That is so sad. I find it bittersweet that he lived in MONTANA, of all places. That miracle play by Joe Montana to Dwight Clark in the NFC Championship game vs. Dallas, what a classic indeed, FJF. ALS, what a horrid disease. Steve Gleason is still hanging on by a thread. My cousin's wife's brother died from ALS two years ago. He deteriorated so fast, it was horrifying. He lasted less than a year from his diagnosis. RIP, Dwight. Ugh.



    ^Great documentary. Watch it.
     
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  3. joe

    joe Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    March, 2018 - R.I.P.
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. 101GangGreen101

    101GangGreen101 2018 Thread of the Year Award Winner

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    RIP to Dwight Clark. ALS is a fucking horrible disease.

    I wasn't even born when "The Catch" happened, but it's always one of the first plays I think of when it comes to all time great plays.
     
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  5. jetophile

    jetophile Bruce Coslet's Daughter

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    Yes, it is. It's the yin to Alzheimer's/dementia's yang. I honestly don't know what's worse, having your mind and being a prisoner in your own body or losing your mind and having a somewhat functional body. Both scenarios are prion related (for DAMN sure), rob people of their dignity, and are extremely awful.
     
  6. 101GangGreen101

    101GangGreen101 2018 Thread of the Year Award Winner

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    ALS you could literally just stop breathing at its strongest stage, you just suffocate, you know its happening in your mind and there's nothing you can do ... being trapped like that to me .... outside of drowning is absolutely the scariest way to go in MY opinion.

    As shitty as this conversation is, I feel like Alzheimer's really hurts the care giver more, I mean imaging knowing someone your ENTIRE life only for them to not have 1 idea who you are. Your mind is gone, but the level of suffering I obviously couldn't comprehend, to me is the "lesser of 2 evils"... but to have your mind be a prisoner, to think and feel your body failing you that is just urgh just fuck these diseases man.
     
    #6 101GangGreen101, Jun 5, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
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  7. ukjetsfan

    ukjetsfan Well-Known Member

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    Dwight Clark was one of the first NFL players I noticed when I started watching the game in 1983. I look back on him now as a player from a different era, the era of football that I fell in love with as a teenager. Everything was new to me at the time - the bright uniforms, the helmets, the gridiron markings on the field. It was all exotic and new and exciting. I've never lost my love for the game but I do sometimes wish football was the same game I fell in love with, where offensive linemen were 250-pound athletes rather than 330-pound monsters.

    It's too soon for me to be losing these players from my formative years as a fan. I feel old. Dwight Clark is the reason I still, deep down, think 87 is always the coolest number on the football field.

    RIP Dwight Clark.
     
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  8. statjeff22

    statjeff22 2008 Green Guy "Most Knowledgeable" Award Winner

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    A very sad story. SI had an article not too long ago about many of his former teammates and close friends (including Huey Lewis of News fame) visiting him for a last time at his ranch. The close bonds they shared seemed very special.
     
  9. jetophile

    jetophile Bruce Coslet's Daughter

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    They're both beyond horrible. With Alzheimer's/dementia and other crossovers, the periods of complete lucidity and full comprehension in the early stages that you are literally going to have your soul completely sucked out of you, that you will indeed be losing your mind and sense of self, that you will revert to essentially being an infant in a diaper, just shoot me. It's a very complicated and loaded subject, but personally I would off myself while I still had enough wits about me to make an informed choice and check out on my own terms. I understand your take on Alzheimer's, but Parkinson's, ALS, anything that affects mind or body to the point of annihilation defies words. Agreed, though that it is a very tough road and extremely heartbreaking and draining for families.

    Public Service Announcement: It is absolutely imperative whether or not you have a Living Will will or a Health Care proxy that you VERBALLY INFORM EVERYONE YOU KNOW, not just one person, what you want if you become incapacitated/end of life with no room for misinterpretation. I can't tell you the havoc that this wreaks on people and their families when individuals keep that to themselves for the most part, and going against someone's wishes, I can't think of anything shittier than that. I've been there, I've seen it, and on top of it on another occasion, I actually lived it (coma). I don't care how young or old you are, have "the conversation".

    It was a terrible few days at the coma. Not expected to live. Got screwed over by a couple of RCC zealot family members on the old man's side who know exactly how I feel about things and they took advantage of me from where I'm sitting. I found out by accident (because somebody slipped) that a priest gave me The Last Rites (now Sacrament of the Sick). They basically wore my mentally and physically exhausted husband down and went over his head. Yeah, they went over his head. I went bananas when someone accidentally leaked it 2 years later, and it caused a tremendous blow out. And this was with everyone knowing my feelings. They couldn't understand why I was so ungrateful that what they did caused God to save my life. I did eventually get an apology when I said how would you feel if I sent in some Santeria Priestess to say some whodoo shit over your ass when you were vulnerable and couldn't object that you wanted Jesus the Lord. They finally got it but I was justifiably angry for a very long time.

    Then several months later when I had to have brain surgery . . . at intake : "Religion?" "None." "Are you sure? Religion?" "NONE. I WROTE DOWN NONE." What happened to me was just as egregious as denying someone something that was spiritually important to them. It wasn't right, but other family members rushed to excuse it by saying that it came from a good place. Screw that. I have a friend who is a death douhla. Too bad I didn't know her then because she would have assessed the situation, told them in no uncertain terms to leave the old man alone, and would've shut them down in a NY minute. OK, this took a left turn, huh?

    Anyway, again, have "the conversation". You still might get screwed over like I did, but your chances are far, FAR less; and trust me, when I begin to die again, what happened won't be a repeat in syndication.
     
    #9 jetophile, Jun 6, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018

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